Alzheimers Association Goals and Principals

In: People

Submitted By kmaks
Words 316
Pages 2
Alzheimer’s Association
What are the organization’s goals? How are they tied to its ethical principles? Describe the role and importance of the corporation’s ethical values.
The Alzheimer’s Association’s goals are the same as any other organization to raise awareness of the disease and provide anyone interested in the disease with a large amount of valuable and reliable information. A larger goal of the association is to one day end Alzheimer’s their vision is “A world without Alzheimer’s” (alz.org, 2011) The Associations mission is “to eliminate Alzheimer’s disease through the advancement of research; to provide and enhance care and support for all affected; and to reduce the risk of dementia through the promotion of brain health.”( alz.org, 2011) The association has a very informed website that provides things to help such as knowing what it is; 10 signs; stages; treatments; diagnosis and risks of the disease all related to their goal of raising awareness. All the information being sent out is obviously useful and a large part of their awareness goals but their ultimate goal of one day curing Alzheimer’s is more important. Their “Walk to End Alzheimer’s” it is a walk around the country that helps raise money for the research of the disease that is the sixth most leading cause of death. The problem that these goals may reflect on the organization could interfere ethically they cannot give any confirmation to anyone if they might have Alzheimer’s they make it aware and even give advice on how to go talk to your doctor. Ethically the organization cannot be prejudice against age or gender the disease can affect anyone. The importances of the corporations’ ethical value are staying away from personnel issues and simply provide the facts and information.

alz.org. (2011). Alzheimer's Association. Retrieved from…...

Similar Documents

Alzheimer

...and older and is classified as sporadic AD. The prevalence of AD varies among many different factors, including age, co-morbidities, genetics, and education level. There is no way to definitively diagnose AD without performing an autopsy. There is no cure for AD, however promising research and development for early detection and treatment is underway. Abstract Alzheimer’s disease was discovered in 1906 by Alois Alzheimer, a German neurologist and psychiatrist2. The disease was initially observed in a 51-year-old woman named Auguste D. Her family brought her to Dr. Alzheimer in 1901 after noticing changes in her personality and behavior. The family reported problems with memory, difficulty speaking, and impaired comprehension. Dr. Alzheimer later described Auguste as having an aggressive form of dementia, manifesting in memory, language and behavioral deficits3. Dr. Alzheimer noted many abnormal symptoms, including difficulty with speech, agitation, and confusion4. He followed her care for five years, until her death in 1906. Following her death, Dr. Alzheimer performed an autopsy, during which he found dramatic shrinkage of the cerebral cortex, fatty deposits in blood vessels, and atrophied brain cells2. He discovered neurofibrillary tangles and senile plaques, Bethune 3 Alzheimer’s Disease vs. Dementia and Normal Aging Alzheimer’s disease is often confused with normal aging and dementia. Severe memory loss, characteristic of AD, is not a symptom of normal aging.......

Words: 4642 - Pages: 19

Alzheimers

...drugs or disease often end in losing battles. That is why some neuroscientists have greeted the Obama administration’s goal of preventing or treating Alzheimer’s by 2025 with skepticism." (1) While I understand the author's concern about declarations leading to losing battles, I also believe that speaking out against drugs and disease can lead to positive change. Last semester in my Biostatistics class, I had the opportunity to attend a lecture from a member of the Cache County Study on Memory Health and Aging. It is a collaborative group of studies with researchers at Utah State University, Duke University Medical Center and The John Hopkins University. This study is conducted in Cache County, Utah and is designed to examine genetic and environmental factors associated with risk for Alzheimer's disease. This study has been going for longer than 16 years and has enrolled over 5000 residents of the county. The reason the study is conducted here is because Cache County elderly have longer life expectancy than other areas of the United States, make it a prime location for the study. The project investigated three important assumptions which are first, certain genes may influence Alzheimer dementia in old age, second, Alzheimer's has a maximum occurrence near 80 years of age and then decreases and third, specific environmental factors may reduce Alzheimer dementia before the age of 85. (2) I find this study so fascinating and not only because it is happening so close......

Words: 668 - Pages: 3

Alzheimer

...Can Alzheimer be reversed? Many experts suggest that 5.1 million Americans have Alzheimer disease (“About Alzheimer Disease: Alzheimer Basic”). I currently take care of my grandmother and she was diagnosed with Alzheimer Disease about three almost four years ago. I would have paid anything for her not have to suffer through this disease. Alzheimer Disease (also known as “AD”) is a disease that is growing within our population and has not found a cure. If they do not find a cure Alzheimer’s will have a risk to increases with age, and the U.S. population is aging. The number of people with Alzheimer’s doubles for every 5-year interval beyond age sixty five (4). Studies show, by 2050 over 13 million will have the Alzheimer disease (“Alzheimer's Facts and Figures”). Alzheimer is a disease that forms in your brain. Abnormal deposits of proteins form amyloid plaques and that tangles throughout the brain, and once-healthy neurons begin to work less efficiently.( “About Alzheimer Disease: Alzheimer Basic”) For a example it is the sign at a railroad crossing that the gates are no longer going back up. Alzheimer is one of the most common forms of dementia. (“About Alzheimer Disease: Alzheimer Basic”) Dementia has many causes besides loss of memory. It can have a effect on memory, language, attention and problem solving. Dementia can also have affect on their attitude and behavioral, where they might yell or hit you. Dementia can lead a person living completely dependent on someone...

Words: 776 - Pages: 4

Alzheimers

...Alzheimer's disease was discovered by Dr. Alois Alzheimer, who did a great deal of research in the early 20th century regarding the disease. Research implies that there are some risk factors that seem to be linked in people with Alzheimer's disease. Much research has been done to try and track the origin of Alzheimer's disease, and many include environmental and genetic causes. (3) Alzheimer's is classified into two types; familial AD, which runs in families and follows inheritance patterns, and sporadic AD, in which no clear pattern of inheritance is found. Family history is considered a major risk factor. Individuals who have a relative with the disease are much more likely to develop it themselves. (4) Alzheimer's affects over four million people in the United Stares. Researchers predict that as the baby boomer generation begins to age, Alzheimer's could impact as many as 14 million people nationwide. The number of Alzheimer's cases is growing rapidly, afflicting 10% or more of people aged 65 or older and almost half of those over age 85. Alzheimer's is slightly more prevalent in woman than men. (3) Aging greatly increases the risk of developing Alzheimer's. Alzheimer's is usually seen in those over age 65, a rare and threatening type of Alzheimer's can occur in younger people in their 40s and 50s. This type is usually a result of family history or traumatic brain injuries experienced earlier in life. Aging in normally associated with the decline in the abilities to......

Words: 2052 - Pages: 9

Alzheimers

...1. Title: Aging cells offer new target for Alzheimer's therapy 2. Author: Jessica Hamzelou 3. Published: September 26, 2012 4. http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg21528843.200-ageing-cells-offer-new-target-for-alzheimers-therapy.html?full=true 5. Alzheimer's disease is the most common type of dementia. It is normally diagnosed in people over the age of 65, but it can be diagnosed earlier than that (early-onset Alzheimer's). There are many stages of Alzheimer's. In the early stages, a patient simply forgets recent events. In more advanced stages, they can have mood swings, language difficulty, problems with bodily functions, confusion, and aggression. "On average, the life expectancy following diagnosis is approximately seven years" (Molsa PK, Martilla RJ, Rinne UK, 1986). The causes of Alzheimer's has long been unknown, and has accounted for the hundreds of unsuccessful treatments. Scientists recently discovered large numbers of senescent cells in Alzheimer's patients. Senescent cells are cells that lose the ability to divide after many cycles of division, which results in deterioration and death of the cell. Claudio Torres at Drexel University College did an experiment to show the damage of senescence. He exposed human astrocytes (star-shaped cells in the brain) to hydrogen peroxide, which mimicked the metabolic stress that occurs with aging. It showed that cells started displaying similarities to genes associated with senescence. "Torres's team then looked for......

Words: 417 - Pages: 2

Alzheimers

...com/info/what/what-is-alzheimers-disease.jsp?utm_source=google&utm_medium=cpc&utm_term=+causes%2Bof%2B+alzheimer's%2B%2B%2B&utm_campaign=Unbranded%2BSigns%2Band%2BSymptoms%2B5/11&gclid=CIrGwvG9l6wCFYpb7AodaSjuUA). There are several symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease listed on the website www.alzheimersdisease.com[->0] including misplacing things. Objects are not just being misplaced but being placed in areas they should not be an example of this is instead of placing a purse on the counter when a person walks into the house they may place it in the freezer or refrigerator. Everyone may lose something for a short amount of time but when the object is placed somewhere completely out of the ordinary there may be reason for concern. Another symptom mentioned in the above website is when there are problems with language they may forget the name of something as simple as socks and instead ask for their “foot coverings”, it is common when we age to be unable to come up with the right word but not forgetting something used on nearly an everyday basis for many years. Diagnosing the disease is normally done by the person’s primary care physician. “Then the doctor may refer the person to a specialized center for memory evaluation, or to a neurologist (a nervous system specialist), geriatrician (a specialist in old age), or a psychiatrist for additional testing to be sure the diagnosis is correct.” (http://www.alzheimersdisease.com/info/diagnosing/diagnosing-alzheimers ......

Words: 1654 - Pages: 7

Alzheimers Disease

...early onset, caused by mutations in the amyloid precursor protein and presenilin genes, both linked to Aβ metabolism. By contrast with familial disease, sporadic Alzheimer's disease is very common with more than 15 million people affected worldwide. The cause of the sporadic form of the disease is unknown, probably because the disease is heterogeneous, caused by ageing in concert with a complex interaction of both genetic and environmental risk factors. This seminar reviews the key aspects of the disease, including epidemiology, genetics, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment, as well as recent developments and controversies. 100 years ago, Alois Alzheimer gave a lecture at a congress in Tubingen, Germany, on the first case of the disease that Kraepelin some years later named Alzheimer's disease.1 In this single case. Alzheimer described typical clinical characteristics with memory disturbances and instrumental signs, and the neuropathological picture with miliary bodies (plaques) and dense bundles of fibrils (tangles), which we today know are the hallmarks of the disease. Here, we review the epidemiology, genetics, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of the disease. We also cover the latest discoveries on the molecular pathogenesis and the implications for the development both of new drug candidates with potential disease-modifying effects and of new methods for early diagnosis, taking into account existing controversies. Epidemiology and risk factors Alzheimer's......

Words: 7059 - Pages: 29

Alzheimers

...Alzheimer’s Disease Susan Edmonson Daymar College Alzheimer’s Disease Alzheimers Disease is a progressive, deteriorating disease that attacks the brain causing diminished memory, thinking and behavior. Therefore it is imperative to know how Alzheimer’s disease is diagnosed, risks and the different stages of the illness. It is an illness that is evident in a gradual decline in brain function that gets worse with time. It can affect a person’s ability to find words, finish thoughts or follow instructions. Learning about Alzheimer's disease and realizing that it is much more than memory loss can benefit the families of those with the illness. This disease is progressive and eventually leads to death. While there is no cure, it can be treated. Alzheimer’s is not a classic part of aging (What is Alzheimers, 2015). It can earnestly affect a person’s ability to carry out daily activities. Those affected by Alzheimer’s live an average of eight years after the symptoms are evident. One can survive from four to twenty years, dependent on the age of the person and their health situations (What is Alzheimers, 2015). “In 2013, as many as 5 million Americans were living with Alzheimer’s disease”(Center for Disease Control, 2015 ). There are quite a few risk factors that can increase one’s risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease (Cummings,2008). “Aging is the most powerful risk”(Cummings, 2008). Having a family history of dementia can also be a risk factor, even though it is......

Words: 1811 - Pages: 8

Alzheimer

...2012). Donepezil is applicable in the pathophysiology and is commendable by the therapeutic efficacy of its control. There are various conventional discussions based on the categorization and basis of dementia. The concept made by Emil Kraepelin'sdetermines that is a formulation of a Sigmund and disease. On the other hand, Freud perceives Alzheimer’s disease is an expression of internalized loss and weakness (Unützer, & Park, 2012). Alzheimer’s disease may not be categorized as a homogeneous disease, but it is a sophisticated phenomenon that has various subtypes and at least one etiology. It also has various predispositions in symptomatology that range from mild to severe symptoms. A2. Standard of Practice: The American Psychiatric Association presents the best practices to be followed while addressing Alzheimer’s disease disorder. The practices aim to assist healthcare providers in making informed decisions by providing systematic strategies. Most Alzheimer’s disease disorders are curable based on evidence- based approaches. Many dementia disorders increase the rate of patient’s morbidity and mortality. The disorder requires the application of randomized clinical trials. There is also the need for intervention and use of right drugs like to manage the disease and reduce adverse medical side effects. Therefore, appropriate treatment reduces symptoms and assists the patient to manage the depressive disorder (Unützer, & Park, 2012). A2a. Pharmacological Treatments:......

Words: 1284 - Pages: 6

Alzheimers

...function are commonly accompanied, and occasionally preceded, by deterioration in emotional control, social behavior, or motivation. Alzheimer disease is the most common form of dementia and possibly contributes to 60%-70% of cases. Alzheimer disease (AD) is characterized by a progressive decline in cognitive function. AD is substantially increased among people aged 65 years or more, with a progressive decline in memory, thinking, language and learning capacity. AD should be differentiated from normal age-related decline in cognitive function, which is more gradual and associated with less disability. Disease often starts with mild symptoms and ends with severe brain damage. People with dementia lose their abilities at different rates. Whether these changes may be a cause or consequence of AD remains to be fully understood, but inflammation within the brain, including increased reactivity of the resident microglia towards amyloid deposits, has been implicated in the pathogenesis and progression of AD. The more individuals advance in age the higher is the risk they will develop Alzheimer disease. Most patients develop AD after the age of 65 years old. The risk of developing AD reaches 50% for individuals beyond age 85. Because more and more people live longer lives this disease is becoming a serious concern. The age-specific incidence rates for Alzheimer disease demonstrate a doubling of incidence for about every six years of added life, which indicates an exponential......

Words: 967 - Pages: 4

Alzheimers Association Goals and Principals

...The Alzheimer’s Association’s goals are the same as any other organization to raise awareness of the disease and provide anyone interested in the disease with a large amount of valuable and reliable information. A larger goal of the association is to one day end Alzheimer’s their vision is “A world without Alzheimer’s” (alz.org, 2011) The Associations mission is “to eliminate Alzheimer’s disease through the advancement of research; to provide and enhance care and support for all affected; and to reduce the risk of dementia through the promotion of brain health.”( alz.org, 2011) The association has a very informed website that provides things to help such as knowing what it is; 10 signs; stages; treatments; diagnosis and risks of the disease all related to their goal of raising awareness. All the information being sent out is obviously useful and a large part of their awareness goals but their ultimate goal of one day curing Alzheimer’s is more important. Their “Walk to End Alzheimer’s” it is a walk around the country that helps raise money for the research of the disease that is the sixth most leading cause of death. The problem that these goals may reflect on the organization could interfere ethically they cannot give any confirmation to anyone if they might have Alzheimer’s they make it aware and even give advice on how to go talk to your doctor. Ethically the organization cannot be prejudice against age or gender the disease can affect anyone. The importances of the......

Words: 288 - Pages: 2

Alzheimers

...beliefs and her church support system. They helped her keep connected and supported. I also feel adult daycare could have been helpful but my grandmothers teacher retirement put her in too high bracket for assistance and too low for being able to afford much. The main help as my grandmother got worse at home would have been respite care and as Ma got worse home health care. My aunt is the oldest child and was not young when she took over this role. One key resource that really would have helped is the Safe Return Program. Ma frequently got out of the house looking for my long deceased grandfather. The other resources such as the alzheimers association might be helpful by phone. My aunt being in a much older generation does not use a computer. On a happy note my aunt is healthy, active and a happy 81 year old with no signs of alzheimers....

Words: 608 - Pages: 3

Alzheimers

...Alzheimer's is not just a disease of old age. Alzheimer's affects people younger than age 65. Up to 5 percent of the more than 5 million Americans with Alzheimer’s have younger-onset. Many people with early onset are in their 40s and 50s. Defined by the Mayo Clinic - Alzheimer's is a irreversible disease that causes the brain cells to degenerate and die causing a steady decline in memory and other important mental functions. It's the most common cause of dementia. Dementia is the loss of cognitive functioning—thinking, remembering, and reasoning—and behavioral abilities — these brain disorders result in the loss of intellectual and social skills and interfere with day-to-day life. Alzheimer's disease is named after Dr. Alois Alzheimer. In 1906, Dr. Alzheimer noticed changes in the brain tissue of a woman who had died of an unusual mental illness. Her symptoms included memory loss, language problems, and unpredictable behavior. After she died, he examined her brain and found many abnormal clumps. Alzheimer’s disease affects approximately 5.3 million people and is ranked 6th for cause of death in America. A question you may ask is can someone die from Alzheimer’s I would have to say yes. Now you are wondering how can one die from memory loss…well typical complications of Alzheimer's are heart attacks, thromboembolisms (blood clots), strokes, kidney failure, and lung infections due to aspiration of food. Multi-organ failure is usually the cause of death in these......

Words: 857 - Pages: 4

Alzheimers Disease

...in Treating Alzheimer’s Disease Name Institution   Table of Contents Abstract 3 Summary 4 Introduction 5 Present Therapeutic Regimens for Alzheimer’s disease 5 Methods 7 Search Strategy 7 Exclusion/ Inclusion Criteria 8 Relevant Information 8 Results 9 Discussion of Results 12 Epidemiological information linking type 2 diabetes to AD 16 Insulin-signaling abnormalities in Alzheimer disease affected brain 17 Diabetes drugs in treatment for AD 19 Treatments regimens for type 2 diabetes Mellitus and their potential in treating AD 23 Thiazolidinediones (TZDs). 23 Metformin. 23 Amylin and Leptin analogs. 24 Findings 26 Interpretation of Results 26 Limitations 28 Future Research 29 Conclusion 31 References 32   Abstract Type 2 diabetic drugs could serve as potential in the treating Alzheimer’s disease. AD is a dementia defined by partial or total loss of memory. The risk of development of AD increases with age. Different therapeutic approaches have been employed when it comes to treatment of AD. Results of indicate that diabetic drugs are effective in treating Alzheimer ’s disease. Despite efforts directed at treatment of the condition, the results have not been satisfactory. This could be attributed to the early or late onset of AD pathogenesis while at the same time being underpinned by various mechanisms. There is evidence suggesting the effectiveness of type 2 diabetic drugs in treatment of AD. Research has focused on understanding the......

Words: 9399 - Pages: 38

Alzheimers Disease

...We have to be patient, provide love, attention, and affection to these persons. Most of the times, family is the key to supply the daily care to the patient with AD. While the disease advances, they are more limited to do their dayli activities. This a very hard issue for the family member, and can affect their life in all aspects. “The Alzheimer’s Association has chapters nationwide that provide educational programs and support groups for caregivers and family members of people with Alzheimer’s disease”. (Locator, 2006) In addition, the Alzheimer’s Association web site, chat windows and message posters, which can be very supportive in all these cases. Their message boards have over 9,000 associates around the country, and a lot of more people, that are curious and they browse the stories and information that is provided 24/7. They also have support groups. These groups are forming by trained and experimented people. A lot of locations provide groups that are particularized in treatment for children, people with an prompt-stage and younger-onset of Alzheimer’s, and other with different needs. (Alzheimer's Association, 2011) While we are taking care of the patients at home, is very important to keep a safety enviroment for them. Be safe at home starts with accomodating the enviroment to back up the patient with Alzheimer’s disease abilities that are changing constanlty. We have to make sure to reevaluate the safety measures at home, as new issues start......

Words: 2369 - Pages: 10