Australia’s Potential Uranium Mining Industry

In: Social Issues

Submitted By krafty
Words 2153
Pages 9
Australia’s Potential Uranium Mining Industry
Summary
Australia’s Uranium Resource Position Australia is the world‟s richest country in terms of uranium resources. Australia‟s uranium resources are spread over 85 deposits and accounts for 23% of the world‟s total resources. Kazakhstan is the current largest producer, producing 40% more tonnes of uranium than Australia while have considerably less reserves. Canada has the highest grade deposits but with much less resources than Australia, however they too produce much more uranium. ‘Three Mine Policy’ Introduced more than 30 years ago this policy inhibited the growth of Australia‟s uranium mining industry until 2007. The policy was changed in order to promote the future of Australia. Ending this policy has impacts on the Australian economy and the world supply of uranium.

Nuclear Energy

Nuclear energy has been adopted in many countries in the world including developing countries. Australia however, although having the largest uranium resource is largely against Nuclear power. The many issues of nuclear reactors include carbon output into the environment, toxic waste and location.

Introduction
Australia is the richest country in terms of uranium resources. Australia‟s mining industry has been limited by the introduction of the „Three Mine Policy‟ in the 1980‟s. The current government has recently ended this policy allowing the possibility of increasing the size Australia‟s uranium mining industry. Nuclear power

has been adopted in many countries in the world but Australia remains opposed even though there are many advantages over fossil fuels.

Australia‟s Uranium Resource Position
Australia has the worlds largest uranium resource comprising of 1 243 000 tonnes of uranium which accounts for 23% of the worlds total supply. This resource is spread over 85 uranium deposits in Western Australia, Northern…...

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