Black Women Relationships with Black Men

In: Social Issues

Submitted By drconner
Words 5846
Pages 24
Dear Ms. Educated Black Woman

Dexter R. Conner

Upon realizing that my baby daughter would one day read this, I re-examined every word. To the most beautiful girl on earth – Daddy loves you.

1|Dear Ms Educated Black Woman

Preface I began having serious thoughts pertaining to the dynamics of Black romantic relationships in college upon traveling to Atlanta and conversing for hours with Spelman College’s exceptional Black women. It was like the television show A Different World. While my reason for routinely making the two hour trip from my college was to convince a particular one of these women that she was to be my wife, it became clear that a unique dynamic was on the horizon. Many of the educated Black women I encountered had confidence in their academic and professional journey, but lacked clarity on whether enough educated Black men with at least an ounce of swagger shared their dream of creating a formidable family. It was a fair question then, and remains a growing dilemma affecting educated Black women today. Since that time I have consistently spoken with Brothers, Sisters, family members, friends, and others about the challenges facing Black relationships. Those conversations have inspired me to share my humble thoughts for anyone willing to indulge me. As you read beyond the passion of my words, hopefully sincerity and love will be visible, along with a creative spirit that you find interesting enough to continue the exposé. Expect to see the tremendous influences of film & television, hip-hop, fiction, nonfiction, humor, politics, scholarship, and of course God as significant portions of my writings. All of these play a vital role in how Black relationships have taken shape. I will italicize significant titles within these genres at times to emphasize them as materials worthy of consideration for your repertoire.…...

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