Case Study - Panic Disorder

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Case Study Report

What diagnosis has been given to this client?

Panic Disorder with Agoraphobia

Background Information

Please outline the major symptoms of this disorder.

According to the DSM, the major symptoms of Panic Disorder with Agoraphobia are, recurrent panic attacks and enduring anxiety about experiencing another panic attack. The individual is also anxious about going places where escape might be difficult or embarrassing, or where they will be unable to receive assistance in case of emergency. The symptoms cannot be better explained by another medical or psychological effect.

Briefly describe the client’s background (age, race, occupation etc).

The client is named Annie, and she is a 24 year-old Caucasian woman. According to the case history she had an abusive relationship with her parents, and started experiencing mental health problems during puberty. Annie is currently unemployed, and is receiving disability payments from the federal government. Please describe any factors in the client’s background that might predispose him or her to this disorder.

During the interview, Annie states that her childhood was normal. However, during the interview she occasionally alludes to some abusive experiences, but is reluctant to talk about them any further. The client also makes reference to the night terrors she experienced at the young age of four, eight and twelve. These “intense” nightmares terrified her growing up, and she attributes some of her anxiety to them. She believes that after the night terrors she experienced anxiety over a constant feeling of dis-reality and dissociation, due to flashbacks of the night terrors occurring in her everyday life.

Observations

Please describe any symptoms that you have observed which support the diagnosis. You can include direct quotes or any other behaviors you may have…...

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