Changes in Social Relationships at Work Under Different Modes of Production

In: Social Issues

Submitted By tawanda
Words 1709
Pages 7
NAME; TAWANDA

COURSE; INDUSTRIAL SOCIOLOGY

QUESTION; DESCRIBE THE CHANGES IN SOCIAL RELATIONSHIPS AT WORK UNDER DIFFERENT MODES OF PRODUCTION.

Social relationships at work have been changing over time under different modes of production. However, the definition of work has been a contested area due to factors like the differentiation and work and labour, work and non-work and work as employment among other factors. Even though Arendt (1958) defines work as activity undertaken with our hands which gives objectivity to the world. Social relations have been changing to meet the demands of the type of mode of production. In broad outline, Marxist theory recognises several distinctive modes of production characteristic of different epochs in human history.

Primitive communism is the first mode of production in the Marxist theory. This is described as a traditional type of cooperation which first appeared about two million years ago. During this period relations of production were based on collective ownership of the means of production by individual communes. They used extremely backward productive forces and primitive forces of labour which can also be called collective labour thus social relationships at work were characterised by collective labour. Due to these characteristics there was economic equality among the primitive people and the absence of exploitation of man by other man. These people were independent with no one to push anyone. During this period, according to Watson J.T (1995), one`s work was seen more as an inevitable burden than as a way of oneself. Hard work was done because survival demanded it. There was also little separation of home and workplace. However, there was a division of labour which was based on sex and age only. There was no private ownership of anything.

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