Database Book

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FUNDAMENTALS OF

Database
Systems
SIXTH EDITION

This page intentionally left blank

FUNDAMENTALS OF

Database
Systems
SIXTH EDITION

Ramez Elmasri
Department of Computer Science and Engineering
The University of Texas at Arlington

Shamkant B. Navathe
College of Computing
Georgia Institute of Technology

Addison-Wesley
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Alan Fischer
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Sandra Rigney and Gillian Hall
Elena Sidorova
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Rebecca Greenberg
Holly McLean-Aldis
Jack Lewis
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