Emotional Quotient

In: Business and Management

Submitted By mbadmapriya
Words 6542
Pages 27
EMOTIONAL QUOTIENT
“A TOOL FOR INDIVIDUAL AND ORGANISATIONAL EFFECTIVENESS ”

M.Badmapriya , School Of Management
Hindustan University, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India

ABSTRACT

Emotional Quotient is a concept, which comprises Emotional Competency, Emotional Maturity, and Emotional Sensitivity. Emotional Competency constitutes the capacity to responding tactfully for various situations, Emotional Maturity constitutes evaluating emotions of oneself and others, and Emotional Sensitivity constitutes managing immediate environments, Maintaining rapport, harmony, and comfort with others.

Emotional Quotient is considered as the subset of social Intelligence that involves the ability to monitor one's own and others' feelings and emotions, to discriminate among them and to use this information to guide one's thinking and actions.

This research work makes an attempt to establish the magnitude of emotional quotient among the management executives of the Manufacturing Industry. The research is restricted to management executives who will be key decision makers in terms of both long and short-term goals.

INTRODUCTION

Happiness, fear, anger, affection, shame, disgust, surprise, lust, sadness are emotions, which directly affect our day-to-day life. For long, it has been believed that success at the workplace depends on our level of Intelligence quotient (IQ) as reflected in our academic achievements, exams passed, marks obtained, etc. All these are instances of intelligence of academic variety. But how bright we will be outside the classroom, faces with life's difficult moments? Here we need a different kind of resourcefulness, termed as Emotional Intelligence (EQ), which is a different way of being smart.

Emotional Intelligence is what gives a person a competitive edge. Even in certain renowned business establishments, where everyone is trained to be…...

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