Evaluate Nietzsche's Critique of Christian Morality

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In Friedrich Nietzsche’s “On the Genealogy of Morality,” the author addresses the historical origins and circumstances that influenced the meaning of our current moral values. Nietzsche argues that Christian morality sprung from the resentment that the weak felt for the strong, which led to the revaluation of preexisting values through the development of slave morality. This slave morality was designed for the protection and glorification of the weak and aroused sympathy and guilt in the strong, which, consequently, began to question their power and legitimacy. Nietzsche criticizes Christian morality, highlighting that it is an infective rationalization of weakness, which hinders the growth and progress of the human race. However, it could be argued that Nietzsche’s arguments are too naturalistic and can only be viable when based on an atheistic framework. In addition, despite the thorough critique of Christian morality, Nietzsche fails to offer an alternative system of morality, which questions the plausibility of his arguments.

Nietzsche argues that Christianity sprung froth from Judaism and asserted that Christian morality was developed from the base motivation of what he called ‘ressentiment’, which is the feeling of hostility that the slaves held for the master race. The philosopher claimed that the Jews, out of their ressentiment and hatred for the strong master race, began to reject the “aristocratic value equation,” which stated that the good are the strong, the powerful, the wealthy, and that the bad are the weak, the cowardly. In order to seek retaliation and devalue the masters, the slaves inverted the concept of good and bad and created their own morality, slave morality, which valued humility, sympathy and became a moralistic distinction of “good” and “evil.” This self-interested creation of the weak allowed the slaves to gain power by corrupting the…...

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