Explain How the Role of Women in Us Society Changed in the 1920s

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Submitted By hannahwalford
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Explain how the role of women in US society changed in the 1920s

In the 1920s, the roles of US women changed in many different ways.

At the start of the decade, women did not have the same rights as men and it was thought that their only jobs in life were to cook, clean and to please their husband.
However, more and more women began to get jobs as the war had left the country’s men in a bad state and the women who had worked throughout the war didn’t want to go back to doing nothing. This meant that they began to earn their own money and for the first time women could become more independent from their husbands.

Some women took brought the independency from men to a whole new level. Women called ‘Flappers’ did not marry at a young age (although generally did marry in later life) and supported themselves. They did many things which were looked down upon in that era such as: sex before marriage, smoked and drank in public places and wore short revealing clothes.

Despite the fact that flappers helped to change western attitudes to women, there was some criticism surrounding them because there was still a strong conservative element in the American society.

Therefore I think that ultimately without the flapper movement women would not have been thought of as being able to take care of themselves but through the flappers choices, 1920s society was proved to that women were just as capable to work for a living and be social just like the…...

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