Germany Experienced a Period of Political Calm, Economic Development and Social Progress in the Mid-1920s? How Far Do You Agree with This Judgement?

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‘Germany experienced a period of political calm, economic development and social progress in the mid-1920s? How far do you agree with this judgement? (30 marks)

It is argued by many historians that Germany experience a period of political calm, economic development and social progress in the mid 1920s for a variety of reasons. There is evidence to support the claim that the economy developed in the mid 1920s, due to the fact that there was significant monetary stability and a growth in available capital. Furthermore, one can argue that social progression was achieved, as a result of the improvement in housing and public health and the development of a Weimar culture. Moreover, it can be argued that political stability was maintained in this period due to the outcome of the 1924 May elections, the Dawes plan and the election of Hindenburg as President. However, while this is true, it is important to remember that there is also sufficient evidence to support the view that Germany did not experience a period of political calm, economic development and social progress as economic instability contributed to the deterioration in social development, as the economic discord between employers and labourers resulted in polarisation. Moreover, the extent of social development in terms of the role of women, youths and the development of the constitution is highly debatable. Additionally, it can be argued that political stability was weakened due to the Young Plan, the 1928 May election and the collapse of the grant coalition. Therefore, it is clear that the extent to which Germany experienced a period of political calm, economic development and social progress in the mid-1920s is highly debatable, as it is evident that solutions to solve problems born out of hyperinflation and divisions within society during the early years of the Republic were only short term, and may have…...

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