Ibm's Study

In: Business and Management

Submitted By will2124
Words 874
Pages 4
PM 750 Week 5 Individual Assignment
IBM-Successful Enterprise Project Management Office
Zhaojie Wang (Will)
Brenau University
Nov 26, 2013

Why IBM should establish PMO
Growing global competition, change the staff ability and resources pressure, plus client technology rapidly changing expectations affect IBM's bottom line, the company to reconsider its organization structure, business mode and management methods. With the help of some influential people are professional project managers, IBM believes the practice of project management is the key in a reliable way to its global customer complex business solutions. Lack of good project management is the failure of some project, customer satisfaction, revenue and profit. IBM's CEO believed team, set up a strategy converts IBM project based enterprise by improving the project management of the company's core competitiveness. And then execute the steering committee charter and continue to guide the IBM project management center of excellence (PM/COE), a formal enterprise project management office, as its agent converts the IBM project based business changes.
Enterprise PMO
Implementation across IBM global project management ability of organization, PM/COE establish and promote a consistent professional infrastructure, a common method based on industry standards and support project management agents including process, tools and measuring system. As Rad said: “A fully-functional enterprise project management office (EPMO) would provide tools, techniques, and principles to the project team for project cost, schedule, scope, and quality” (Rad, 2007). It also developed and supported the IBM community knowledge of project management personnel. Point to perform the role of the interface between the project manager of IBM and other internal and external professional communities.
5 keys of Successful EPMO in IBM
1 A…...

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