Importance of Mentoring in Nursing

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Importance of Mentoring In Nursing
Cynthia B. Harris
Chamberlain College of Nursing
NR504 Leadership & Nursing Practice
Spring A March 20th, 2011
Professor Schoenly

Importance of Mentoring In Nursing
My Vision for nursing is for nurses to become more proactive in mentoring nursing staff both new and old. The role of the nurse mentor is often referred to as preceptorship. Although mentoring and precepting are different, they are still similar but often overlap. By nurses taking part in mentoring their peers, they are helping to promote leadership skills, teaching skills, and foster professional development for all nursing staff. The CNA (2004) states, “Mentoring involves voluntary, mutually beneficial, and long-term professional relationships among nurses if done effectively and respectfully.
In this relationship, one person is an experienced and knowledgeable leader (mentor) who supports the maturation and education of a less experienced person, for example, new nurses and returning nurses (mentees) to the work place with leadership. There are so many opportunities for the seasoned nurse to teach new and returning nurses but because of often hectic schedules, staffing issues, and nursing shortages this often falls to the wayside. This can lead to lack of confidence, frustration, and feelings of being “lost” out in the work area. Nurses often streamline their duties to complete their shift in a timely fashion and opportunities to mentor or teach are missed. These missed opportunities would have provided the potential to increase the new staff’s knowledge base, assessment skills, or and confidence in their nursing roles. When these missed opportunities accumulate, it can often make the new nurse feel frustrated and overwhelmed which can lead to high turnover in a unit. They may even question their choice of becoming a nurse all together.…...

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