Jack Bass Case Study

In: Business and Management

Submitted By felenciah
Words 811
Pages 4
Jack Bass, Accounting Professor
Case 2

Keiser University
ACG 5075
Dr. Gray
May 17, 2011
Jack Bass A cheating situation occurred with Jack Bass, an accounting professor. Bass had given his students an exam and at the end asked them to identify any test items that had been graded incorrectly by the Scantron machine and submit it to the teaching assistant. After this Bass suspected that some had changed their answers. So, for the next exam, Bass made a copy of the students’ exams and asked them to do the same thing for identifying incorrect answers. After comparison of the copy and the resubmission it was discovered that some had changed their answers. Jack brought the situation to the dean and this resulted in those students withdrawing from the course and receiving sanction letter on their academic file. All the cheaters agreed to this accept one, D.R. Street III. His argument was that he misunderstood the directions and that he should be allowed to withdraw without a sanction letter. When the dean said no he had his father talk with the chancellor and ultimately he was allowed to withdraw without the sanction letter.
Entrapment
Jack Bass did not entrap his students by withholding the Scantron information from them. Cheating is a serious offence at any academic institution. Regardless of the situation, whether the cheater was caught off guard or not, cheating still occurred. Students are completely aware of the consequences of performing an act of academic dishonesty. They should behave accordingly at all times, that is, be honest about your work. This is something that should be implemented for all exams. Of course one may not be able to catch every cheater but it will definitely make students think twice before cheating.
Repeat Offenders There should be no difference in the punishment for new offenders and repeat offenders. In reading the…...

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