Oedipus the King

In: English and Literature

Submitted By inches0526
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The story of Oedipus the King, is about his destiny and choices he makes along the way. Oedipus from the beginning was destined to kill his father and marry his mother. The God’s had already set this life for the king, but they never expected him to make the decisions he made to fulfill his destiny.
When the play begins, the citizens of Thebes are begging their king, Oedipus, to take away the plague that threatens to destroy the city. Oedipus sent his brother-in-law, Kreon, to talk to the oracle at Delphi to learn on what to do. When he returned, Kreon announced that the oracle instructed the city to find the murderer of Laios, the king who ruled Thebes before Oedipus. As soon as they find out who murdered the late king, it would be an end to the plague. Oedipus took upon himself to find out who murdered the king. Tiresias, the blind prophet refuses to speak, but finally accuses Oedipus himself of killing Laios. Oedipus orders him to leave, but before he leaves, Tiresias hints of an incestuous marriage, future of blindness, infamy, and wandering. Oedipus then goes to Jokasta for advice. She told him to ignore prophecies because a prophet once told her that Laios, her husband, would be killed by her son. According to Jokasta, it never came true because the baby died, and Laios himself was killed by a band of robbers. Oedipus then begins to worry because just before he came to Thebes he killed a man who resembled Laios. To learn the truth, Oedipus sends for the only living witness to the murder, a shepherd. When Oedipus heard the prophecy that he is going to kill his father and sleep with his mother he ran away, even when he knew there were suspicions of him being the real son of his parents. The prophecy was bound to happen, no matter what he may have done to avoid it, but his actions that he did before were determined by fate. When he learned of Apollo's word, he…...

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