Sociology a-Level

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AQA AS Sociology

SCLY2: Education with Sociological Research Methods

Student Guide

Introduction
According to sociologist Michael Rutter we spend 15000 hours in the education system. Consequently the schooling process has a large role in forming our personalities. For some, education also manages to act as a way of socialising people into the norms and values that are seen to be important for a particular society. For others it can be seen as a source of conflict particularly when issues surrounding gender, class and ethnicity are put under the sociologists, ‘microscope’. It also provides an excellent indicator of how political ideology affects social policy, with the changing of governments impacting on educational policy.
Some questions sociologists are interested in about education are: * Why do some pupils achieve more than others? * What is the relationship between education and the economy? * What is the purpose of education? * Do pupil’s school experiences vary?

Assessment

The course will be assessed by examination only.

The examination will consist of various short answer question and essay style questions.

Date of Exam: June 2010
Duration: 2 hr

The Unit 2 exam is worth 60% of your final AS level grade. There will be 90 marks available on the paper.

You will answer one question on the chosen topic, one question on sociological research methods in context and one question on research methods.

Assessment Objectives

AO1 Knowledge and understanding of the theories, methods, concepts

a) The nature of sociological thought
AS and A Level candidates are required to study the following concepts and theoretical issues:
• social order, social control
• social change
• conflict and consensus
• social structure and social action
• the role of values
• the relationship between sociology and contemporary…...

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