Software Copyrights and Patents

In: Computers and Technology

Submitted By thila90
Words 3386
Pages 14
Software Copyright and Patents

Introduction
The escalating speed of the advancement in the software industry has put many parties in a competitive race to come up with new softwares for commercial purposes. This digital arms race contributed to a rapid increase in software patents from a mere 45 average patents a week in year 1985 to an average 1200 patents a week in year 2012 (Patent Metrics, 2013). Intrigued by such large numbers of software patents, multiple studies have been carried out by scholars to investigate the impact of software patents to the software industry. The studies sparked an ongoing debate on whether software copyrights and patents are beneficial or detrimental for the software industry. This paper touches lightly on the methodology of software copyrights and patents under the current standards of the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO). It then explores the benefits of copyrights and patents in the software industry and lay out the drawbacks of software patenting. Finally, this paper provides a possible four-point solution to the problems concerning software patents.

Methodology of Software Copyrights and Patents
According to WIPO, copyright is defined as something that “provides exclusive legal rights to a creator to publish, print, perform or materialise an original work and authorize others to do the same” (2002). In the context of software copyright, a software is subject to copyright as soon as it is documented in a verifiable manner. What that means is that, an individual does not necessarily need to register a copyright to own one on his original work. Then again, it is always advised that a developer registers a software at any intellectual property firms like the Intellectual Property Corporation of Malaysia (MyIPO) depending on country of residence. This is to ensure that the original work has a legal value for…...

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