The Philippines a Century Hence- Commentary

In: Historical Events

Submitted By Gilian
Words 1115
Pages 5
The Philippines A Century Hence

PART ONE
The first part of the essay outlines briefly how the Spanish colonization have changed the cultural landscape of the Filipino people and how well those people managed to indoctrinate our forebears.
In the latter part of the essay where events turned to favour Filipinos’ plight much of the work revolved on the effaceable influence of the Spaniards on our race. The formidable diminution of liberty and despotic leadership have ceased to effect cooperation not only in the Philippines but also among all other tyrannized subject of the Spanish crown. They denied to them not only capacity for virtue but also even the tendency to vice, a very loathsome condition for our antecedents.
For Rizal, Spain made a big mistake of ignoring what history has for them. That instead of pursuing their old ignoble ways they could have been more beneficent to appease the “ingrate” heart of the people as they term it.
Rizal in his work didn’t absolutely decry the Spanish race. For one, it would be illogical to associate the conduct of a certain portion of the populace as a national character. He did recognize some notable men whose thinking far transcends the obstinate mind of the ministers. Although speaking in general terms, he dismissed such exceptions as rather a separate case.
In conclusion, men truly respond to what is set on the table. Lamentation or delight sprung from the manner the food was presented and how the food appeal to senses. Had they been treated as they should be, there would not have been a tumult of rancor.

PART TWO
The second half focused on the atrocities committed against the race and how the Filipino people could have escaped their disconsolate state had they taken advantage of the crisis which Spain sustained. The continued ignorance of Spain in granting the Philippines the needed reforms to counteract the jinx…...

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