Victorian Morality

In: Other Topics

Submitted By mood
Words 587
Pages 3
Victorian morality is a distillation of the moral views of people living at the time of Queen Victoria's reign (1837–1901) and of the moral climate of the United Kingdom throughout the 19th century in general, which contrasted greatly with the morality of the previous Georgian period. Victorian morality can describe any set of values that espouse sexual restraint, low tolerance of crime and a strict social code of conduct. Due to the prominence of the British Empire, many of these values were spread across the world.
The term "Victorian" was first used during The Great Exhibition in London (1851), where Victorian inventions and morals were shown to the world. The Victorian Age was a complex era characterized by stability, progress and social reforms, and, in the meantime, by great problems such as poverty, injustice and social unrest; that’s why the Victorians felt obliged to promote and invent a rigid code of values that reflected the world as they wanted it to be, based on: * duty and hard work; * respectability: a mixture of both morality and hypocrisy, severity and conformity to social standards (possessions of good manners, ownership of a comfortable house, regular attendance at church and charitable activity); it distinguished the middle from the lower classes; * charity and philanthropy: an activity that involved many people, especially women.
The family was strictly patriarchal: the husband represented the authority and respectability, consequently a single woman with a child was emarginated because of a wide-spread sense of female chastity. Sexuality was generally repressed and that led to extreme manifestations of prudery.
Colonialism was an important phenomenon and it led to a patriotism deeply influenced by ideas of racial superiority: British people thought that they were obeying to God by the imposition of their superior way of life.…...

Similar Documents

Morality

...What is Morality Introduction to Philosophy American Intercontinental University David C. Koopmans September 23, 2012 Abstract This paper discusses whether infanticide is universally morally wrong, or morally right withing certain contexts. The focus of the paper is going to be that infanticide is universally morally wrong. Infanticide is the practice of killing a newborn baby that is practiced in many other cultures, but is deemed illegal in the United States. The question is, is this practice universally morally wrong, or is it morally right within certain contexts. Cultures exist that make having multiple children an extreme financial burden, or due to population control, illegal to have more than one child. Even within these contexts, does it make it morally right to practice infanticide? No, it does not! The practice of infanticide is universally morally wrong. Infanticide is practiced in several cultures, one of which is Pakistan. According to cultural relativism, this practice is deemed morally right. Cultural relativism deals with actions that are specific to a culture and the individuals within a specific culture. The beliefs and customs of a particular culture are relative to the individuals within that culture. What may be morally right in one culture may not be right in another (gotquestions.org, 2011). Relativism deals with the fact that individual societies may deem, for themselves, what is right or wrong. Since truth...

Words: 1527 - Pages: 7

Morality

...UNDERSTANDING CHRISTIAN MORALITY • Fundamental Principle of Morality • The most basic principle of morality is deceptively simple: do good and avoid evil. • Jesus states his version of this adage which is found in the Sermon on the Mount. It is known as the Golden Rule – “Treat others the way you would have them treat you: this sums up the law and the prophets.” (Mt 7:12) • This is message is concerned with action, with positive effort on behalf of others. Contrast this with the teaching of a famous Jewish rabbi of Jesus’ day. When asked to sum up the teaching of the law and the prophets, the rabbi responded: “Avoid doing to others what you do not wish them to do to you.” Whereas the message of Jesus is to get involved as the Father has gotten involved with humanity, the rabbi cautions a more conservative approach. The rabbi wants us merely to keep from harming others. Jesus wants us to act, not just react. • Jesus further puts his own special seal on this maxim by stating the two greatest commandments: love God and love one another. To love someone is to seek to do good to them, and certainly, at the very least, to avoid doing them evil. • What is Christian Moral Life? • Misconceptions 1. Reduced to avoidance of sin 2. Reduced to a series of don’ts and dire punishment if we fail • What is Christian Moral Life? • Positive and Fuller Meaning 1. Moral theology should start with God and God’s love - JP II (Veritatis Splendor) : The moral life is a......

Words: 1729 - Pages: 7

Morality

...than decisions under natural phenomenon. (Practical reason vs. Rational reason) Morality First Proposition of Morality: The relationship between duty and inclination: inclination has more personal connection and motivations which make the decisions and actions more introspective, which is why we need a strong will. Decisions can be moral if people do not perform actions under what they are told but truly become introspective about what they have in mind. Second Proposition of Morality: Duty lacks personal responsibility and thus, it cannot be understood as having followed by material principle. Third Proposition of Morality: Similar to the above: duty does not have a full account of respect, therefore does not require personal commitment into thinking under morality Mill: Basic definition and Ideas: Mentions satisfaction level, yet happiness are ultimately due to pride and dignity. Happiness cannot be measured under any quantity terms and each type of happiness is different. Happiness is the absence of pain and pleasure and unhappiness is deprivation of pain and pleasure. He also believes that people should enjoy in order being truly satisfied.. Morality: All the good things under the system of morality, Mill states, should be under personal interest. He says that the system of priority is designed to intent to pleasure the individual alone. Mill > Kant: In order to attain morality, happiness should cooperate with duty and good will Examples: Family......

Words: 1888 - Pages: 8

Morality

...Tiange Zou ESL 102 Kate Murphy November 25, 2011 Morality: Right and Wrong People knew the meaning of the word morality in their early age because parents and teachers had tried very hard to teach children to possess the virtue qualities of morality such as caring, compassion, and courage. However, there is a tendency that people act differently when they encounter the morality in real life. For instance, some people are hesitant to help out a wounded person on the street when they assume police would do that. These people absolutely know it is wrong not to help a wounded person according to the caring aspect of morality. Knowing something is not right to do but to do, people contradict themselves by the influence of societies, individualism, and governments. First of all, societies can change people’s ideas and behaviors about morality. In other words, people will choose what others doing in a society instead of obeying the criteria of morality. Therefore, this action will emerge a moral contradiction. For instance, there was a shocking incident happened in Foshan city in the south of China. A two- year- old girl was twice hit by two different cars on a very busy street and 18 pedestrians indifferently passed the girl without doing any effort to help the girl. The girl was finally saved by a garbage collector after lying on the street for a long time (The Guardian). Many Chinese people and social......

Words: 1251 - Pages: 6

The Victorian Teaset

...What Does The Victorian Tea Set Tell Us About Consumption In 19th Century Britain? A) Conspicuous Consumption and Social Emulation Consumption began to increase greatly as the industrial revolution kicked in, meaning that demand rose substantially for many goods not readily available to the masses beforehand, for example, tea. The Victorian tea set can tell us a great deal about consumption and conspicuous consumption in 19th century Britain. For instance, that appearance and the expensive belongings people had were important to one’s image and social stature, therefore, for families that were able to afford such things such as an expensive Wedgwood tea set were seen as important and wealthy people. The Victorian tea set also became a fashion accessory. Furthermore, luxury and consumption also began to grow more hand in hand. However, conspicuous consumption and social emulation affected the working classes greatly which will also be explored. Wedgwood, being a producer of high quality tea sets in the 19th century, began to aim its products at a much wider market by the 1840s by producing mid – range tea sets so that more British households could afford such luxuries.[1] This shows that demand and conspicuous consumption was on the rise as many more people began the need for this new fashion accessory, hence Wedgwood expanding into this mid – range market. The rise in demand of tea sets ultimately evolved from the fast growing popularity of tea, as it became a......

Words: 946 - Pages: 4

Victorian Novels

...A. Hare English 46B May 18, 2012 Final Question 1 Victorian novels Emma by Jane Austen, Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte, Middlemarch by George Elliot and early twentieth century novel Mrs. Dalloway by Virginia Woolf all portray and emphasis a heighten sense of awareness in their societies, social lives and love. The evolution of main characters in each of the novels shows transition between the writers and characters through close observations of social interactions. Victorian novels more often idealized a sort of portrait of love and luck that wins out towards the end; rewarding virtue and that wrongdoer are punished. This however was to be intended to improve the moral nature of one’s heart. Twentieth century writers had and a slightly different view of that of Victorian writers in which embodied a more modern period and more modern view on life. The concepts of love in each of these four distinct novels are apparent in the way that each are craftily structured. Jane Austen’s Emma use of free indirect style for example on page 327-28 which marks a crucial moment in the novel where the main character Emma has a crucial realization “with insufferable vanity had she believed herself in the secret of everybody’s feelings; with unpardonable arrogance proposed to arrange everybody’s destiny”; the theme in which this novel centered around a number of marriages and social status. In gaining social advancement was especially important for women if they stood a chance for......

Words: 835 - Pages: 4

Victorian Age

...The Victorian Age Angela Anderson Troy University Victorian Family Life The term ‘Victorian’ describes everything what is connected with period of the reign of Victoria Regina (1837-1901). Queen Victoria acceded to the throne in 1837 at the age of eighteen. She reigned for 63 years until 1901. The Victorian Age in the history of England is the period of transformation and developments in approximately each sphere. Although this period was a time of unprecedented changes, the fabric of society remained invariable throughout the second half of the nineteenth century. The British people at that time were traditionally puritan and straight-laced. They adhered to the codes of conduct and took care of their moral appearance. Despite the fact that the working class predominated quantitatively, the Victorian age was the time of the middle class prosperity. Significant part of the working class representatives struggled to meet some unspoken social demands to deserve the right to be called middle class. A family as a social unit was regarded a foundation stone of the Victorian society. Men and women played different social roles and fulfilled different functions as family members. There was no equality between sexes and social classes; and it could be traced in all spheres (education, availability of work and salary rank). In general, the Victorian Age is a period of striking social contrasts and...

Words: 2577 - Pages: 11

Morality

...Assess the view that morality is a conventional agreement for our mutual advantage This is the argument of Social Contract Theory first put forward by Thomas Hobbes. This is the theory that people only act morally because it is mutually beneficial and that we humans by nature are selfish creatures. Those who disagree with Hobbes’s Social Contract theory may argue that since there is no historical evidence of there ever being such an agreement signed by humans then how can the theory be true. On top of this Humanity has always lived in social groups and therefore never had a time where Hobbes’s theory of how life would be if we did not have a ‘Social Contract’ has never been tested and is invalid. On the other hand, these people appear to have taken the idea of a Social Contract in a literal instead of metaphorical way. Hobbes never suggested that people ever actually sat down and negotiated a contract, instead he was simply theorising what life for humanity would be like if all our laws and morals were stripped away he simply claimed that if we lived in a world without laws or morals that groups of humans would make agreements with others to make life easier for all parties. Another claim that may be made by those who disagree with Hobbes is that, if we are selfish and did not actively agree to follow this contract then surely we have no obligation to follow it? Although it is to our advantage for everyone else to be moral but if you were to gain an advantage from......

Words: 387 - Pages: 2

The Victorian Age

...1 THE VICTORIAN AGE   The Victorian Compromise The Victorian Age takes its name from Queen Victoria who ruled from 1837 to 1901; it was a complex era characterised by stability, progress and social reforms, and, in the mean time, by great problems such as poverty, injustice and social unrest; that’s why the Victorians felt obliged to promote and invent a rigid code of values that reflected the world as they wanted it to be, based on: * duty and hard work; * respectability: a mixture of both morality and hypocrisy, severity and conformity to social standards (possessions of good manners, ownership of a comfortable house, regular attendance at church and charitable activity); it distiguished the middle from the lower classes; * charity and philanthropy: an activity that involved many people, expecially women. The family was strictly patriarchal: the husband represented the authority and respectability, cosequently a single woman with a child was emarginated because of a wide-spread sense of female chastity. Sexuality was generaly repressed and that led to extreme manifestations of prudery. Colonialism was an important phenomenon and it led to a patriotism deeply influenced by ideas of racial superiority: British people thought that they were obeying to God by the imposition of their superior way of life. The concept of “the white man’s burden” was exalted in the works of colonial writers (such as Rudyard Kipling). This code of values, known as “Victorian......

Words: 9412 - Pages: 38

Morality

...It is all relative: A look at what is “right” and “wrong” with our views on morality In her article “On Morality,” Joan Didion attempts to address the subject of morality, a word that she says she “mistrusts more every day.” Many people trace morality back to Socrates and his Greek compatriots, but it is not as if those philosophers thought one day out of the blue, “Gee, understanding right from wrong and making valued choices based on that understanding sounds like a great way to live. People should just do that from now on!” No, the idea of morality did not randomly pop into some ancient toga wearing philosopher’s head; morality is innate in human beings. The concept of morality has become prevalent in our species over time through biological and societal evolution, and is made stronger in individuals through upbringing and social development. However, as Didion notes in her article, what is right, what is wrong, and the very meaning of morality itself has become difficult to discern in today’s modern world. Morality has its roots in the evolution of our species. In order to have a better chance of survival and reproduction in the big old scary Stone Age world, early humans used social bonding and grouping to gain a competitive advantage. These early groups were only as strong as the relationships between their members; groups with individuals who empathized with one another and looked out for one another would have a better chance at survival and procreation....

Words: 756 - Pages: 4

Victorian Ideals

...Conclusion During the Victorian era, men and women searched for an ideal relationship based on the expectations of a demanding society. After reading the researched expectations of men and women of the Victorian era and relating them to Wilde’s two works, this research study can acknowledge the effect the expectations have on these characters; especially the men. Analyzing the characters in Oscar Wilde’s works, The Importance of Being Earnest and A Woman of No Importance, show how the expectations of society effects the characters’ behaviour and their reaction to society’s ideals. Oscar Wilde examines the impact of Victorian society’s unrealistic expectations on the individual in The Importance of Being Earnest and A Woman of No Importance, showing how rejection, whether from a potential partner or society as a whole, can lead to deceit and engaging in a double life in order to satisfy conventions. As it stands, these comedies are the fullest embodiment of Wilde’s lifelong assault upon commonplace life and commonplace values. It was inevitable that the conventional world should strike back at Wilde, at his character and his ideas, if not specifically at his play, but the speed and cruelty of the world’s retribution surpassed expectation. Four days after the opening of his last and finest comedy, the succession of events began that brought about his disgrace, imprisonment and exile. Wilde felt strongly that men and women should be treated equally when it came to sexual......

Words: 300 - Pages: 2

Morality

...religion your parents are or the morals and values in your culture. Morality and values differ from person to person or culture to culture. In this essay I will argue that morality can be objective or subjective in a sense that we get some of our morals from what God gave us but we also learn our morals from different people and our daily influences. Morality and personal values vary from religion. In many different religions we all have similar values and morals because our faith all stems from one main source.But there are different branches where are faith and morals differ. For example, as a Christian we believe in many things that God said in the Bible. Our morals and values are very concrete and we should follow those ‘rules’ to the best of our abilities. Some of those set ‘rules’ are do not have sex before you married or follow the 10 Commandments. Those rules or morals are set in place to so can go to heaven. But in other religions such as Islam they don’t have the same morals or values as we Christians do. In the Islamic religion girls at a certain age have to start to wear the hijab. The hijab represents modesty. These morals and values vary in many other different religions. I think that if you are bonded to one religion is represents you and makes you feel like you are a part of something special. Religion can be represented in many different ways and many religions vary in values and morals. Morality can be defined by our surroundings. When we are younger the......

Words: 688 - Pages: 3

Morality

...Morality & Ethics in Corporate World Inspired and infuriated in equal measure by this week’s Moral Maze (BBC Radio 4, 9 February 2011) on Multiculturalism — a fact that is indicative of just how good the programme is — I have been reflecting on two aspects of the discussion that were, to my way of thinking, conspicuous by their absence — a lack of clarity between ethical principles and their moral application, and our need to go beyond pluralism and cultural integration in the UK. The discussion reflected on the Prime Minister’s statement last week that “State Multiculturalism has failed…” because we, in the UK, have failed to provide a vision of society to which they want to belong.” The “they” in question referred to Muslim organisations in receipt of public funds, which, said the Prime Minister, do little to tackle extremism. “We have even tolerated these segregated communities behaving in ways, which run counter to our values.” A genuinely liberal country “believes in certain values and actively promotes them“, Mr Cameron said. “Freedom of speech, freedom of worship, democracy, the rule of law, equal rights, regardless of race, sex or sexuality. “It says to its citizens: This is what defines us as a society. To belong here is to believe in these things.” He said that under the “doctrine of state multiculturalism”, different cultures have been encouraged to live separate lives, and he argued that the UK needs a stronger national identity. The Moral Maze called...

Words: 757 - Pages: 4

Victorian Research Paper

...The British Victorian Era, 1837 to 1901, can be classified as being the era of sharp criticisms of Victorian class structure, social hypocrisy, and marginalization of women. Throughout many novels, some particularly based on World War I, postcolonial times, the morality of the Victorians, etc., there is quite an elaborations for these allocations. During this time period, social class systems and the apportionments pre-defined a specific class “ladder” that many people had been either born into and stayed in that specific class or tried to work into a harder class. Some of the connotations of this era were seen to be “prudish”, “suppressed”, and “primitive”. First in the novel Regeneration, the author, Pat Barker, demonstrates the stubborn class divides of English society through the interactions of the officer ranks (typically upper class/ nobles) and private soldiers (almost entirely working class or poor) in its military during WWI. This is the best illustrated through the character of Billy Prior, a working class man who achieves the rank of captain and often reflects upon the tensions in the British army that result from class prejudice. For example, class distinctions were exhibited through English society, especially in the military.  The military is "structured” around class and have many ways recreated the British class system in: aristocratic generals, middle-class officers, and a working class rank. This particular structure made the military more......

Words: 1477 - Pages: 6

Morality

...Morality (from the Latin moralitas "manner, character, proper behavior") is the differentiation of intentions, decisions, and actions between those that are distinguished as proper and those that are improper.[1] Morality can be a body of standards or principles derived from acode of conduct from a particular philosophy, religion, or culture, or it can derive from a standard that a person believes should be universal.[2] Morality may also be specifically synonymous with "goodness" or "rightness." Moral philosophy includes moral ontology, or the origin of morals, as well as moral epistemology, or knowledge about morals. Different systems of expressing morality have been proposed, including deontological ethical systems which adhere to a set of established rules, and normative ethical systems which consider the merits of actions themselves. An example of normative ethical philosophy is the Golden Rule, which states that: "One should treat others as one would like others to treat oneself."[3] Immorality is the active opposition to morality (i.e. opposition to that which is good or right), while amorality is variously defined as an unawareness of, indifference toward, or disbelief in any set of moral standards or principles. An initial naïve attempt at a descriptive definition of “morality” might take it to refer to the most important code of conduct put forward by a society and accepted by the members of that society. But the existence of large and heterogeneous societies......

Words: 1480 - Pages: 6