Vietnamese Culture- Beliefs and Rituals of the Death

In: Religion Topics

Submitted By gigichocolate
Words 1029
Pages 5
Vietnamese culture- beliefs and rituals of the death Vietnamese culture may be still mysterious and unknown to most people outside of the country. Nowadays, the amount of foreigners come to Vietnam is increasing day by day; some people come to travel, and some come for their business. Getting to know, Vietnamese culture is interesting and fascinating because of its varieties. Since Vietnam is an Asian country, it has a lot of differences in culture compare to the Western countries, and Vietnamese beliefs and rituals of the death is one of the most interesting topics. Death is a part of life that everyone has to accept. We all have to die. “Death and grief are normal life events, all culture have developed ways to cope with death in a respectful manner” (Carteret). Vietnam is a small country, but it has numerous traditions concerning death rites. Different parts of Vietnam have separated death beliefs and rituals. Vietnamese honor and respect their ancestors and the deceased people so they strictly pay attention to funerals and worships. To them, funeral is a big ritual in a life cycle. Every region and religion has its own definition and how the funeral should be. Funeral usually includes many processes which is made and dedicated from those who are living to the person who has died. In Vietnam, when a person is about to die and his/her family may predict, the first judgment is asking whether that person wants to weary anything; these last few words are called the will. After that, the family washes and cleans his/her body and put some nice clothes on him/her. Sometimes, when an old person is in his/her last few years of life, like my grandmother, she tells her eldest son to find a tailor and make her a white silk set of clothes, so she can wear it in her funeral. It is considered a will from the person, and everybody should respect that. Back in the old day,…...

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